Flynn said sanctions would be 'ripped up'

Marie Harrington
December 7, 2017

President Trump's first national security advisor, Michael T. Flynn, texted a former business associate on Inauguration Day that Obama-era sanctions against Russia would be "ripped up" and that a lucrative proposal to build nuclear reactors with Russian partners in the Middle East was "good to go", a witness has told Congress.

The allegation - which suggests the Trump administration was eager to lift sanctions imposed by President Barack Obama and that Flynn may have blurred his public and private roles during his brief run at the White House - was outlined in a letter Cummings sent to Rep.

'Our committee has credible allegations that President Trump's National Security Advisor sought to manipulate the course of global nuclear policy for the financial gain of his former business partners, ' wrote Cummings, Politico reported in a story on the letter.

"I do not bring this whistleblower to your attention lightly", Cummings, the Baltimore lawmaker and top Democrat on the committee wrote in the letter.

"These grave allegations compel a full, credible and bipartisan congressional investigation", Cummings wrote, according to the New York Times.

Trump initially considered lifting the Russian sanctions - which were a response to Moscow's military intervention in Eastern Ukraine in 2014 - but ultimately decided against it. The texts were timestamped as being sent just as President Trump was delivering his Inaugural Address, the whistleblower said.

The office of special counsel Robert S. Mueller III was aware of the witness's account and asked Cummings not to release the information until the special counsel had taken "certain investigative steps", which are now complete, Cummings wrote.

According to the account, the unnamed whistleblower ran into Copson at a party in Washington, D.C. on inauguration day.

More news: Chiefs Jets Week 13 score, highlights

Flynn, while involved in the Trump transition, worked with companies including ACU Strategic Partners to make a deal with Russian Federation to build nuclear reactors in the Middle East.

Neither Copson nor an attorney for ACU responded to a request for comment.

Flynn had worked as a consultant for ACU Strategic Partners, the group pushing the proposed nuclear deal, in 2015 and 2016.

"Mike has been putting everything in place for us". The investigators are searching for further evidence that Flynn lobbied from his government job as National Security Advisor for associates who had retained his consulting firm before the election. "They have now informed us that they have done so".

Flynn's lawyer did not respond to a request for comment on the latest claims.

Cummings has argued that the Flynn plea deal should alleviate that concern. And one of the companies involved in the project covered his travel expenses and wrote him a check for $25,000 for the trip, though it's not clear if Flynn cashed the check. Cummings said his office could not verify the whistleblower's story, and whether Copson was telling the whistleblower the truth, without subpoenaed documents.

Cummings did not name the whistleblower in the letter, but offered to have Gowdy speak with the person directly.

Other reports by TheSundaySentinel

Discuss This Article

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER