Robert Mueller has spent $3.2 million on special counsel's Russian Federation investigation

Marie Harrington
December 6, 2017

President Donald Trump's lawyer Jay Sekulow denied Tuesday reports that special counsel Robert Mueller subpoenaed Deutsche Bank for records related to the president's financial transactions. The Deutsche subpoenas were sent several weeks ago, according to the Bloomberg report.

A day later, the DOJ announced that former Trump campaign aide George Papadopoulos pleaded guilty to lying to federal agents during the investigation about his contacts with three individuals said to have had connections to the Russian government.

The combined $6.7 million spent by Mueller's office and other offices supporting his investigation only covers the special counsel's investigation, not the various congressional investigations of Russia's meddling in the election.

It was reported earlier that as part of his probe into possible collusion between Russian Federation and the Trump campaign, Mr Mueller asked Deutsche Bank to share data on accounts held by Mr Trump and his family.

A release from the Special Counsel's Office says that new expenditure reports will be released every six months, with the next one coming on March 30, 2018.

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But some details are in the public domain: Mr Trump received a $106m loan from Deutsche Bank in 2011 to buy the Doral golf resort in Miami, according to the local land register.

German business paper Handelsblatt first reported the supoena, confirmed by Reuters through an anonymous source close to the matter.

Donald Trump and his family have long-standing ties to Germany's largest bank. A string of bankruptcies at his hotel and casino businesses during the 1990s made most of Wall Street wary of extending him credit. Deutsche Bank may be glad it's being forced to hand over information.

Separately, Deutsche Bank has lent Trump up to $170 million for the Old Post Office, a historic Washington property where he has opened a hotel.

U.S. House Democrats have argued that U.S. federal laws protecting banking customers' confidentiality do not apply to requests from Congress.

Other reports by TheSundaySentinel

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