Rohingya crisis: Bangladesh asks India to not mix up humanitarian & security aspects

Marie Harrington
October 7, 2017

The refugees accuse Myanmar's army - flanked by mobs of ethnic Rakhine - of slaughtering them and burning their villages in a campaign which the United Nations says amounts to "ethnic cleansing".

Haque, who met Foreign secretary S Jaishankar in the Capital on Thursday evening, was also hopeful of India's support to Bangladesh in the wake of the refugee crisis.

Bloody riots in 2012 forced over 100,000 Rohingya to flee to refugee camps in southeast Bangladesh, where many still live.

Royce added that the Trump administration has promised $32 million in assistance - $28 million of which will go to Bangladesh, where roughly half a million Rohingya have fled from across the border since late August.

It conveyed as much to New Delhi, which in fact led to modifications in India's stance including pressure on Myanmar to rein in the security forces, and humanitarian aid to Bangladesh.

He added he believed a "high level" United Nations team would be able to visit the region in "the next few days".

"We planned to administer them with 900,000 doses of oral cholera vaccines", Ukhiya upazila's Health and Family Planning Officer and Vaccination Programme's Coordinator Dr Mizbah Uddin Ahmed told BSS.

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The OIC had made a stand that the refugees should be allowed to return safely to Myanmar and that Naypyidaw should take concrete measures to handle the deadly conflict which had occurred mainly in the Rakhine province which borders Bangladesh.

In one of the major exodus in recent times, more than half a million Rohingya Muslims have arrived in Bangladesh since August 25, to escape getting victimized of the ongoing ethnic unrest in the Rakhine state of Myanmar.

"It is important for the Myanmar security forces to handle the situation with restraint, focusing on the welfare of the civilian population", the Indian representative told the Council's 36th Session as per reports, even as it commended Bangladesh for extending humanitarian aid to such a large number from Rakhine.

"It is not only a people's movement but also a security issue, a border issue, which has the potential to destabilise the region, not just areas in Myanmar and Bangladesh", he said.

Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar's leader, was criticised for not doing more to intervene - but has since spoken out against any human rights abuses.

Lowcock said talks between Myanmar and Bangladesh on a repatriation plan were a useful first step.

Other reports by TheSundaySentinel

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