Trump administration amends travel ban date to keep legal battle alive

Austin Daniel
June 21, 2017

The president approved the changes in a memo as the high court considers whether it will allow the long-stalled ban to take effect. The only branch of the government that is acting outside its constitutional authority is the judicial branch, not the executive branch.

Lawsuits by Hawaii and Maryland challengers argued that the order violated federal immigration law and a section of the Constitution's First Amendment, which prohibits the government favouring or disfavoring any particular religion.

While the dispute over the travel ban and other controversies have simmered during Trump's first few months in office, his choice of the 49-year-old Gorsuch for the Supreme Court won widespread praise in the legal community as well as unanimous Republican support in the Senate.

"President Trump knows that the country he has been elected to lead is threatened daily by terrorists who believe in a radical ideology, and that there are active plots to infiltrate the USA immigration system - just as occurred prior to 9/11", Sessions said in a statement on Monday.

Under the amendment, the 90-day ban won't start until court orders now blocking it are lifted. "I think we can all attest that these are very unsafe times and we need every available tool at our disposal to prevent terrorists from entering the United States". The Supreme Court is weighing emergency applications in both cases, but is likely to act on them together. "The President was clear in his landmark speech in Saudi Arabia: this is not about religion; it is about national security". They are also considering a separate case, from Maryland, that was decided in May by a different appeals court, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit.

More news: Cars 3 speeds to No 1 at United States box office

It may be recalled, on May 25, a federal appeals court in Richmond, Virginia, refused to lift a nationwide injunction that halted a key provision of President Donald Trump's revised travel ban on six Muslim nations. "It can not go unchecked when, as here, the President wields it through an executive edict that stands to cause irreparable harm to individuals across this nation".

Make no mistake, we agree with the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals' ruling in a case that originated in Maryland finding a direct line between President Trump's blatantly anti-Muslim campaign trail statements and his administration's bans against travel from certain Muslim nations.

Masri noted that CAIR filed an amicus ("friend of the court") brief in the case.

A panel of judges in San Francisco unanimously upheld a block on implementation of the travel ban without even reaching the question of whether it amounts to unconstitutional religious discrimination.

Other reports by TheSundaySentinel

Discuss This Article

FOLLOW OUR NEWSPAPER